Why use HSIMS

 

What is HSIMS (Histiocytic Sarcoma Index Mate Selection)?
HSIMS is a tool for the mating selection regarding the HS index of the parents. It calculates, for the next generation, in percentages, the distribution of A, B and C indexes for a specific mating, considering all the HS genotypes possible in the next generation.
Thus, the HSIMS test result is strictly specific to each couple considered. Its use requires the individual HS test of the sir and the dam.
 
HSIMS allows the user to:
- select the matings that would statistically produce the best indexes
- choose the best partner for one stud-dog
- find the best mating for its Bernese Mountain Dog with a C index
- avoid “risky” matings

Concrete examples of HSIMS utilisation:
Warning: The HSIMS result is specific to each considered couple. As a consequence, the examples used and the results shown along this paragraph on the interests of using this HSIMS tool are fictional and do not reflect all the result possibilities.

Reminder of the possible results for the HS test:

I. Selecting matings that would statistically produce the best indexes :

 

ANTAGENE's suggestion :

For the example above, the results obtained using HSIMS show that the mating between an A Bernese Mountain Dog and a B Bernese Mountain Dog is better than the mating between two A Bernese Mountain Dogs.

 

II. Choose the best partner for your stud-dog :

ANTAGENE's suggestion :

In the example above, the results obtained using HSIMS show that the mating B gives the biggest proportion of C dogs. Then, the choice between mating 1 and mating 3 is up to the breeder depending on morphological and behavioural criteria and/or on the dog’s health.

 

III. Find the best mating for a C Bernese Mountain Dog:

ANTAGENE's suggestion :

In the example above, the results obtained using HSIMS show that the mating with dog 2 is better than the mating with dog 1.

 

IV. Avoid "risky" matings:

 

ANTAGENE's suggestion :

In the example above, the results obtained using HSIMS are not beneficial for the selection of a future stud-dog. Statistically, this mating produces mainly C dogs. The breeder should favour to choose another mating.